http://greenzglobal.jp

Hello there! Greenz is a web magazine to share hints on how to create the future we want. We believe sharing good ideas makes people positive and has the power to move society.
At this tumblr website, we inform you the latest updates and some reblogs.

green drinks Matsudo Develops Relationships Through Rice Farming

http://greenzglobal.jp/madrice-4723.html

"If we grow rice by ourselves, our dependence on money will decrease, which may be expected to go localizing and down-shifting your everyday life. "

green drinks Matsudo aims to spread possibility of self-sufficiency and rice farming.

Folding Your Daily Thankfulness With Love “Origami Origami”

http://greenzglobal.jp/origami-origami-4504.html

Inspired by the atmosphere of Paris, “Origami Origami” by Designphil Inc lets you create cute and vivid arrangements by folding, cutting, taping, and curling the 15cm square-size Origami paper.

Some people imagine a paper crane when hear the word “Origami”, but there are a lot more things you can do with it. For example, wrapping flowers, making party ornaments, and even for decorating your dishes! You can arrange almost anything by using “Origami Origami.”

Going Global: Tom Vincent’s Views on the Future of Greenz Global

http://greenzglobal.jp/tom_vincent-4781.html

Ever come across things in Japan that seemed interesting, but had no idea what they were because they were all in Japanese? Well, take a look at “PingMag” and you’ll figure it all out! 

“PingMag” is a web magazine that presents design and works from Japan in both Japanese and English. But the articles don’t scream “JAPAN” into your face – it actually barely mentions that they are from Japan, but instead presents them simply as interesting ideas. 

How has Mr. Tom Vincent, the head of “PingMag”, managed to make this web magazine so popular abroad? Our editor YOSH interviewed him on his view.

Design Thinking Saves Flooding Victims

http://greenzglobal.jp/flooding-4339.html

In 2011, because of severe Tropical Storm Nock-ten, flooding spread through many provinces of Thailand, and flood waters even reached the urban areas. Over 800 people found dead and 13.6 million people affected. 

On this post, I would like to introduce two impressive design projects from Thailand. Both are very distinctive because of their use of ‘design thinking process.’

“Omosiro-Nogyo” raises concerns for farming to save the food culture

http://greenzglobal.jp/omosiro-nogyo-3466.html

The NPO “Omosiro-Nogyo”, which means “fun farming” in Japanese, is giving opportunities to urban residents to understand about agriculture. What they’re aiming is not only making communication between people, but also trying to save the food culture in Japan.

“Setagaya Daita Monocoto Matsuri” saves ghost shopping street.

http://greenzglobal.jp/daita-3717.html

Founder of Monocoto Kobo, Syuji Minami moved to Setagaya Daita years ago. Because he had a lot of support from people in the area, he has been thinking how could he shows gratitude. It flashed across his mind that organizing an event may saves the shuttered shopping street.

Minami named his event, Setagaya Daita Monocoto Matsuri. “Monocoto” means handcrafted products, and “matsuri” means festival. “Monocoto Matsuri” tries to connect creators, local neighbors and visitors through this event.

This Mushroom Growing Kit Changes DIY Gift into GIY Gift – “CTAKEO” 

http://greenzglobal.jp/ctakeo-4088.html

“CTAKEO”is a mushroom growing kit, made from sawdust and mycelium (which forms into mushrooms). It’s especially for “shiitake”, healthy mushrooms native to East Asia.

Since growing foods are becoming worldwide sustainable lifestyle, there are already numerous mushroom growing kits now. But what makes “CTAKEO” distinctive is that it’s decorated like a boxed chocolate cake. Not just a DIY gifting, but trying to connect it to food growing.

“GARBAGE BAG ART WORK” creates chances to enjoy daily scenes.

http://greenzglobal.jp/garbage-bag-art-work-3039.html

How many times do you throw garbages everyday? Maybe 10 times in a trash can, and once at a dump? Instead of putting garbages inside a tank, most people in Japan collect it to plastic bags and take it to a designated place.

But, do you think it’s fun? Who does feel exciting about this? Here are some great examples of impressive designs solving societal problems in a cheerful way.